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Get Reel: Your Guide to Fishing on Amelia Island

Posted on February 24, 2021 |
Amelia Island
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Get Reel: Your Guide to Fishing on Amelia Island
Amelia Island offers a wide variety of angling opportunities for everyone from the beginner to the hard-core angler. It's one of the best places to fish under the warm Florida sun.
Has there ever been a better sport where you can sit on a boat, dock, bridge, pier, jetty, or beach with rod & reel in hand and stare at the water for hours on end waiting for the magic to happen? Where even if you don’t catch anything at all, you can still say you had the best day? Amelia Island is one of the best places to fish under the warm Florida sun because the angling opportunities are endless for everyone from the novice to the hard-core angler. Here are four ways to fish on Amelia Island.

INSHORE

Fishing the backwaters, salt water estuaries, inlets and rivers surrounding Amelia Island is a peaceful activity that offers not only a completely different perspective of the island but a variety of fish to catch depending on where you go.

According to long time charter fishing captain and guru, Terry Lacoss, "Large schools of redfish can be found on the flooded marsh flats and at low tides at creek mouths and the shallow sides of oyster bars. Sea trout school in fast moving currents at the Nassau Bridge, Shave Bridge, deep river channels and flooded oyster bars. Flounder fishing is excellent during the falling tide at the St. Mary's jetties, creek mouths and the deep sides of oyster bars". Take Terry's word for it. For best fishing results, schedule a charter with him or take a FISHING CHARTER with one of Amelia Island’s many captains.

OFFSHORE

If your bucket list includes fishing for that huge catch of a lifetime, you're going to want to head out to sea. And, lucky for you Amelia Island has an outstanding group of experienced charter captains to provide everything you, your family or group will need for a day of deep sea fishing.

Offshore trips usually require an all day  commitment since they can take you anywhere from 8 to 20 miles (or more) away from the coast. Once there, it's more about the quality than the quantity. Hooking and fighting a wahoo, marlin, tuna, amberjack or shark can sometimes last hours, so patience (and strength) is a definite plus. Your charter captain will make sure your day on the water is a memorable one.  

SURF

Surf fishing is popular for those that don't have a boat or a lot of time to committ. Just grab your rod & reel, a cooler of bait and head to the beach. One of the more popular beaches to surf fish along the Atlantic shoreline and St. Marys Inlet is at Fort Clinch State Park.

The jetties on the beach near the fort, are perfect for catching flounder, sheepshead and speckled trout. The best bait to use here are shrimp, mud minnows, squid, finger mullet or lures. Baby and smaller sharks can be caught here as well using cut bait. Forget any gear or bait? No problem. The State Park's visitor center offers a small variety of fishing tackle and bait available for purchase.

GEORGE CRADY BRIDGE FISHING PIER STATE PARK

Located on the southern tip of Amelia Island just eight miles south of Fernandina Beach is George Crady Fishing Pier State Park, named for a local Florida state representative and supporter of the Florida State Park system.

This one-mile long pedestrian-only bridge spans the Nassau Sound and connects Nassau County to Duval County. Anglers fishing here can expect to haul in a variety of fish including whiting, jack, drum and tarpon. Plus, everyone gets to check out what each other is catching… or not catching. 

Whether you fish on your own or with an experience guide, relax, enjoy and remember that your worst day of fishing beats your best day in an office!


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Located just off the coast of northeast Florida, Amelia Island is easy to reach, but hard to forget. With 13 miles of beautiful beaches, abundant native wildlife, and pristine waters, this barrier island has long been a beloved destination for visitors and residents alike.